This is Hyde Daily Photo Volume 1 (2006-2011) which is now in archive mode. For recent photographs please visit Hyde Daily Photo Volume 2. Additional material and links to blogger friends can be found at Hyde DP Xtra.

Saturday, August 25, 2007

Hyde Mill Tower


Last year I showed you a photo of Hyde Mill.

I took another photograph recently. The place hasn't changed much so this focuses on the tower.

13 comments:

Lizzy said...

It is/was locally known as Patrio's - not sure why, perhaps Tom might know

Rambling Round said...

A very rich red! I like this tower.

Old Wom Tigley said...

My parents always refered to this as Hyde Spinning Mill, my father worked here for a while before moving to Ashton Brothers Mill in Flowery Field, where he met my mother.
Some folk still call it Pattrieouoex, (had to look that one up Lizzy) but most call it Senior Service...
I think what I came across while looking for the correct way to spell 'Pattrieouox' tells it better than I could.

History of Hyde Mill Buildings

The Hyde Mill was the first cotton mill to be built on a new site in Hyde in 30 years. The site had been acquired by The Hyde Spinning Co Ltd from the trustees of CJ Ashton at a rent of £10 per annum, with free water rights. A speech given by Sidney Scott the architect said that he believed that the structure would be the equal of any mill ever put up.

‘Perhaps it would not be so ornate; but it would at any rate have a certain amount of appearance; and even if it had no ornamentation its size would be quite sufficient to make it noteworthy object in the district.’

By 1906 the construction of the mill was completed. The Mill was four storeys in height and 47 bays in length and was faced with bright red brick with an Italianate water tower at its south western corner. When the mill was fully furnished with all the machinery it contained 116,532 mule spindles.

Hyde Mill closed in 1958 with 250 jobs being lost, in the mean time however the Mill was sold to J. A. Pattrieouoex, manufacturers of Senior Service cigarettes. The Gallaher group purchased the mill for £110,000 in 1959 from the Hyde Spinning Company. The Mill continued to be used as a cigarette factory for over 40 years with considerable extensions being carried out. In 1999 the factory was closed by the Gallaher’s as production was transferred to Northern Ireland.

Lizzy said...

That's really interesting, I always thought it was a cigerette factory and you could certainly smell it when I was at school behind there. What would £110,000 buy you these days?

Tara's Talk said...

what a wonderful tower (building)! Thanks for sharing it! I enjoyed reading about it as well!

Sally said...

I like that a lot.
Sydney Daily Photo

Meg in Nelson said...

Belated congratulations to your 500. It's mind-blowing. I've been struggling this side of... 200.

terracotta buff said...

I am trying to locate a building listed as 'Gallahers Premises, Manchester'. This building was either built or altered in 1928. I don't know whether this would be the building that you are discussing. Sadly I have very little information to go on. Can anybody help?

Hyde DP said...

terracota buff I think you need to provide us with a contact and a bit more information as to what exactly it is you are seeking and why. This building predates 1928 and was only owned by Gallaghers post 1958. Hyde has only really been referred to as part of Manchester since 1971 when the Adminstrative County of Greater Manchester was created so Hyde Mill seems an unlikely candidate for your building.

Robert said...

The Gallaher building in Manchester is likely to be Derby Street in Cheetham Hill.It closed in the 60s. Gallaher also had a warehouse in Openshaw but I suggest the latter is what you are enquiring about.

Anonymous said...

I used to work for Senior Service and in the early days of Gallaher,the company had a building located on Great Ancoats Street in Manchester next to the Daily Express. If you look on Google street view the building is still called Virginia House also some years ago a statue of a lion which was a company logo was on top of the building but has now gone.

philip worley said...

Hi just a litle tale to add to Hyde Spinning Company. My paternal Grandfather was Solomon Worley and he was the Chief Engineer at the mill.I remember as a youngster being allowed! to go into the Engine House.You could have eaten your dinner off the tiled floor and to go onto the Steam engine itself you had to have a mill rag (like a dish cloth)in each hand so that your perspiration didnt mark the brightly polished steel hand rails. The engine was massive and looked new even though it was over 50years old by then. Grandad used to own a Ford car with running boards this was kept in one of the buildings that was heated by the boilers, needless to say the car did not suffer from rust.I seem to recollect that Grandads second in command was called Alf.
Grandad used to live at 252 Birch Lane and used to be able to see the Engine House from his kitchen window. When "Pats" took over the mill and the Steam Engine was cut up and scrapped Grandad was never the same person he only lived for a few more years after this happened.
Philip Worley (grandson of the above)

sam said...

I worked there for 23 years and until it shut, massive place inside on 5 floors, I don't miss the place just the people.

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